The Ocean At The End of the Lane

Author– Neil Gaiman

Rating- 4.5 Stars

Lurking at the blurred corners of reality, this book transported me to a world of sea-soaked memories and half-real nightmares. It ties together nostalgia and fear in a drowsy, overwhelming narrative. A poignant story buried in the deep realms of childhood, it follows the narrator as he visits his old home and uncovers the memories that came with it. It revolves around the inevitable scars that we carry with us all through our lives, and the dark undertones that define us. Personally, the reason this book meant so much to me was because it felt familiar. Gaiman’s writing style has a way of enchanting the reader into a world that is only partially defined; he leaves the rest to our imagination. Glistening with child-like wonder,paired with harsh strokes of reality, this book gives you closure- but always, always leaves you wanting more.

Ocean

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13 thoughts on “The Ocean At The End of the Lane

  1. Victoria Iskak says:

    Hi, I’ve actually finished reading it! hahaha. It’s awesome, thankyou πŸ™‚ I started it last night during midnight just before going to bed (probably not the best idea, considering how haunting some parts are). All things considered, the story line is pretty simple, but it’s told with SUCH an amazing narration – and I couldn’t put it down.

    One thing I love about this book, is because it can be interpreted in so many ways. For much of the story, I’m wondering about the Hempstock family. In the beginning, I thought that they depict The Fates (Moirai / the classical image of 3 old ladies knitting fate & destiny). But at the same time, the Hempstock always becomes a source of comfort and safety (something that the Fates is never really known for). And towards the end… the three of them reminded me about The Trinity and redemption because of Lettie’s sacrifice.

    But maybe… it all could be as simple as a childhood’s imagination: because for a 7 year old, warmth, food, friendship, and affection that is missing from the reality of his crumbling home… could be the most magical thing in the world.

    What do you think ? And please share about your thoughts about this story! πŸ˜€

    Liked by 1 person

    • Noor says:

      I read it as a simple, 7-year old’s imagination. The Hempstocks were a symbol of comfort in the narrator’s life. However, I absolutely love your different interpretations of the story. Do you plan on reading more of Gaiman’s work?
      πŸ™‚

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      • Victoria Iskak says:

        Haha, I’m not sure. The Ocean At The End of the Lane is the type of book that is great to read for the first time, and I would recommend it to others… but I probably wouldn’t want to read it again. (Hopefully you know what I mean). Do you read his other works?

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      • Noor says:

        Yeah I meant his other books! I haven’t read any of them yet..I’m planning on reading Stardust. Even his poetry and short stories are brilliant. Give them a try!

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      • Victoria Iskak says:

        Haha yeah.. it’s just that since The Ocean is not something that I want to reread… I’m not sure if I should read his other books (since it MIGHT have been in similar style etc). At least, I might take a break and read another genre first.

        Haha, I actually also browsed Stardust after I read it (since I heard that they have the Hempstocks in it)… so yeah, maybe I’ll try it out as well lol. πŸ˜€

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      • Victoria Iskak says:

        Cool, I’ll trust your taste and try it out then πŸ˜€ My absolute favorite author is Haruki Murakami. I love all his books haha. Have you read any of his works? If not, you should try reading Kafka On The Shore. hehe

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